Monday, December 05, 2011

SILENT FIGHT

Everywhere I look I see angry or depressed faces. It seems that over the years the child-like joy that accompanies Christmas gradually turns into frustration and despair. I think everyone knows Murphy's Laws are always on steroids during the month of December. We learn to expect the unexpected as our major appliances and cars have nervous breakdowns during the holiday season or some other major unforeseen expense rears its ugly head. Then add the hustle and bustle of the holiday season to an already crappy mood and what do you have? A grinch in training, of course!

Does growing up and seeing Christmas no longer through the eyes of a child, but through the eyes of a frustrated shopper with limited funds turn the spirit of the season into dread? Does past memories of perhaps a death in the family or a break up taint the holiday season forever? Outwardly, we decorate and act festive, but what do we really feel on the inside? Is Christmas just a well disguised glittery nightmare or a merchant’s dream come true? Where does the true spirit of Christmas reside? In the church? In the home? In the heart? And when it’s found or if it's found, why doesn't it last all year long?

10 comments:

  1. Oh Mildred unfortunately I think you are right on the money with this blog. I think holidays are emotionally charged to such an extent that disappointment and pain are almost a foregone conclusion. It does seem to be a case of our expectations not matching our reality far too often. Have a listen to Tom Lehrer's Christmas Carol for a giggle and then when you are wondering why it doesn't last all year listen to another of his songs National Brotherhood Week! I think Christmas is a nightmare and I have been dreading it for months already! good luck mate.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I hope against hope each year that people will be a little nicer to each other.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Unfortunately, the holidays dredge up all sorts of negative feelings for some people: financial stress, bad memories, dread of seeing relatives one doesn't like, etc.

    For others, the holidays are a time of food, play, friends, and family. I wish it could be like that for everyone, but sadly it is not.

    ReplyDelete
  4. We are all caught up in an ever expanding loop of commercials loading us up with guilt. If we don't buy this or that 'fabulous' item then we don't 'care enough to send the very best' to our loved ones. SPEND! And if it didn't cost a bundle then we are not good enough, we don't love enough, we are not caring enough. But if we stop buying and instead turned to giving of ourselves - i.e. baking something special, making something (sewing, wood working, knitting etc.) then the economy would collapse. Oh my, we who would turn to giving our ourselves might author the downfall of the world as we know it!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I hold out hope Christmas can be what we make of it, and not merely a failure to past or present expectations of self or others. Every year my Christmas gets smaller and simpler - some food and good cheer, and less buying. It seems good enough.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Since I'm not religious, Christmas, for me, has always been about children. My children are grown, so I no longer give a rat's twat about the day.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I LOVE CHRISTMAS....First and formost because I am celebrating the birth of my saviour. I love everything else about it...the giving, the children, the elderly, laughter, giving, the music, the food oh the food....I think even though we may get bogged down with prices and shopping it tends to bring everyone together and share some goof times....maybe I live in a dream world. If so, please don't wake me up :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. OK been off the computer a while and my typing skills have not improved...meant to say good times :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Umm ok meant to say good times lol

    ReplyDelete
  10. Margie: Yes, I know the reason for the season, but I doubt if modern day Christmas reflects what the holiday should actually be like.

    ReplyDelete